Horses for Homeschoolers

Horses for homeschoolersHorses for Homeschoolers is designed specifically to your group’s ages and  needs. Spend part of the day on a farm learning about horses, their special characteristics, safety, and what is involved in the care of horses including many hands on activities. This program includes pony rides and story time. Bring a picnic lunch and enjoy a day at the farm!

Hands-on activities might include:

  • Petting horses
  • Feeding treats
  • Brushing a horse
  • Braiding a horse mane
  • Weighing a horse
  • Measuring horse feed
  • Cleaning a stall
  • Climbing fences
  • Sitting on a saddle
  • Trying on helmets
  •   Rates and Information
      Homeschool field trips created just for your group.

  • Available Thur-Sat
  • $5/person or $20/family
  • Includes pony rides and story time!
  •   Curriculum and literature suggestions available for a fee.

      T-shirts can be ordered for your family  or group.

    Horses and homeschoolers

    Our Horses and Homeschooling story:

    Horses played a very significant role in our lives as we homeschooled our daughter. Our educational philosophy could best be summed up thus: “What is the best educational choice for this child in this year, or this circumstance?”

    The years of educating our children encompassed different states, different school districts, different ability levels, different needs, and different gifts. There was no “one size, fits all” decision for us. So, when Holly was midway through high school we made the choice to homeschool for the remaining years. It was not a new choice for us, but we made it, in part, because of her involvement with horses. She needed more time and energy to commit to her horses and horse activities. Although she had been responsible for morning feedings before school and after school stall cleaning, horse exercising, and turnout, we thought she was ready for more responsibility and opportunity with her four legged friends. Although she wasn’t seriously interested in competition, Holly had begun to explore colleges where she could study about equines and where she could take her horse. This was getting serious!